Rosie Stark obituary

While working as an examiner for the British Board of Film Censors in London in the late 1960s, Rosie Stark, who has died aged 78, also learned how to cook so that, in those pre-feminist days, she could feed her boyfriend’s cricketing chums. The result was The Loaves and Fishes Miracle Cookbook, published in 1976. If the relationship ended badly, her new skills did not.By the 1980s, she was cookery editor on Options magazine. This job was followed by others on BBC Good Food, writing for the Sunday Times and Mail, and co-editorship of Food & Travel magazine. Rosie then became chairman of the Guild of Food Writers; she combined this with an MA in historical research at Birkbeck, University of London, her thesis – it got a distinction – being on 19th-century food production. In 2004, she set up and taught the food writing course at City University. Continue...

From golden lattes to wonder drug – is turmeric really such a super spice?

In the first of a new series about en vogue ingredients and culinary trends, Felicity Cloake examines why the golden spice is being seen as a modern-day miracle foodWhat’s yellow, gathering dust in your cupboard, and almost certainly good for whatever ails you? No, it’s not custard powder (though I wouldn’t be surprised) – it’s our old friend turmeric, “the new kale” according to the Telegraph, “nature’s wonder drug” according to the Daily Mail, and quite simply “one of the most healing things around” as far as healthy eating celebrity Ella Mills is concerned. Until recently, the most complicated thing about this familiar spice, as far as I was concerned, was its proper pronunciation. Agonised threads online are devoted to whether it should be ter-MERick or too-MERic (seriously, when it’s clearly TER-meric), but they largely date back to before newspapers declared it a wonder drug likely to protect against cancer, improve bone density, cure IBS, and help you “shed fat FAST”. As the stylish women’s website Refinery29 puts it, “2017 really is the year of turmeric”. Continue...

Not just ‘a promo girl’: how female brewers are shaking up the craft beer industry

Growing numbers of women are breaking into the male-dominated brewing industry, but stereotypes take a while to change Until a few years ago, an alien picking up TV signals from space would have assumed beer was a medicinal tonic for sweaty men. From Victoria Bitter’s “You can get it mowing, you can get it towing” to Carlton Mid’s ad about four guys who sneak away from their wives and party in adjoining backyard sheds, beer has long been marketed to the so-called working-class man.But the craft beer revolution has brought a wave of entrepreneurs – and with them, a new approach. Increasing numbers of beer company founders and brewmasters are women, while beer companies have awakened to the importance of female beer drinkers, who make up a large and growing share of the craft beer market. Continue...

Nick Haddow’s cauliflower cheese, macaroni cheese and cheese biscuits recipes

In his new collection, the Tasmania cheesemaker shares his recipes for classic cheese dishes Tasmanian cheesemaker Nick Haddow started Bruny Island Cheese in 2003, making his own product the old-fashioned way and then selling it (“illegally”) from an antique display fridge in his living room. For his new recipe collection, Milk. Made, Haddow interviewed many of the world’s top cheesemakers about the history of cheese and the best ways to serve it. Continue...