Ban the barbies, purge the picnics. That’s my summer manifesto | Catherine Shoard

One of my local parks can play host to 100 barbecues at a time, creating a genuine health hazard. It’s time to get rid of themEverybody knows the potency of the smell of home. House sellers must bake whenever a buyer might swing by. For some, lilac or lavender signifies reassuring domesticity; for others, old leather or wood polish.For me, it’s burnt meat. I live within sniffing distance of a grand parade of great, cheap Turkish grill restaurants. It’s lovely, even for the ex-veggie, even when you’re not especially peckish, not least because it means no one who lives round there ever bothers having their own barbecue, so the smell is kept at a happy distance, rather than filling the living room. Walk two miles further into town and you come to one posh park – Highbury Fields – now so swamped by impromptu barbies (about 100 at one time have been sighted) residents risk strokes if they open their windows. Continue...

AB InBev purchase of SABMiller given conditional approval

Competition ruling paves way for creation of world’s largest brewing group, which will make one-third world’s beerThe world’s largest brewer, Anheuser-Busch InBev, has gained conditional approval for its $100bn-plus acquisition of SABMiller from South African anti-trust regulators on condition no South African employees are laid off as a result of the deal.The Competition Commission ruling brings a step closer the creation of the world’s biggest brewing group, which will make nearly a third of the world’s beer. Continue...

OkCupid for unwanted fruits and veg: tech joins the fight against food waste

A crop of web and mobile developers from Silicon Valley and beyond are stopping blemished produce from ending up in landfillsWhen Zoe Wong moved to the San Francisco Bay Area three years ago, she fell in love with the fresh and abundant produce from surrounding farmers’ markets. Wong grew up in Hong Kong, where fruits and vegetables were scarce and imported. After attending college in upstate New York, she moved to California, the largest agricultural state in the country.Soon, though, Wong discovered something was off. “At the market, I’d see farmers getting ready to throw out boxes and boxes of fruit and vegetables they couldn’t sell,” she says. “I was shocked.” Continue...

Readers’ recipe swap: Caramelised | Dale Berning Sawa

Your triumphant tarte tatin, spicy canapes and dulce de leche brownies are sweet temptation indeed...Next time we would love to see your recipes for cardamom. Upload: theguardian.com/witness; email: recipes@theguardian.com; or post them on Instagram @guardian_cook by noon on Weds 1 June. Caramel, when you think about it, is an extraordinary thing – it binds dry ingredients together in baked goods and sweets, and bolsters flavour in soups and stews. It is a technique every home cook should master, and what better way to do so than through these glistening creations? Continue...

The whole restaurant’s a stage in the world of immersive dining

Fancy hunting for your dinner in a forest, or eating at Twin Peaks’ Double R Diner? Immersive dining’s mix of theatre and innovative cooking could be for youIn east London, a sniffy butler is welcoming 12 diners into the 16th century. “Ah, Lord Norrington! Greetings!”, he proclaims to a giggling woman in a floral dress. “Sunglasses indoors, my lady? It works for you,” he smiles at a leather-jacket-clad attendee, before rolling his eyes and harrumphing: “It doesn’t seem stupid at all.” Around him are dangling lace curtains, pictures of dead Elizabethans and a vase of roses complete with dry ice that submerges the table in a rolling fog. “Dinner is served!” he announces. At which point, a haughty aristocrat leaps out and startles the diners half to death.This is immersive dining – specifically, a project called Chambers of Flavours, by theatre-cum-cookery crew Gingerline. Over the past eight months, they have fed about 17,000 guests – sometimes on a gondola, sometimes shoving them into a gigantic machine that looks like something from 80s kids’ TV programme Bertha. In this instance, they are taking them on a tour of theatrical sets (or “parallel dimensions”), where actors serve up a different themed course in each room. Continue...